#MakeMeRead It 2018 Read-A-Thon Poll | Vote!

It’s that time of year again! The #MakeMeRead It Read-A-Thon is just around the corner, running this year from August 6–13th. It was co-created and is still co-hosted by Ely @ Of Wonderland and Val @ The Innocent Smiley. I’m proud to say that I’ve participated (or tried to) every year since its inception in 2015!

I wasn’t sure if I was even going to try participating in #MakeMeRead this year. I have had a loose plan of the books I want to read for review each week all the way through to October. Additionally, I learned that I’d be out of town the week #MakeMeRead starts, and I don’t find it terribly easy to read on family vacations. But I didn’t want to break the chain of tradition, so I decided to make this work for me!

The books I’ve selected are books were for the most part not originally on my agenda to read in August. Realistically speaking, I think I’ll only be able to manage one book during the week of the read-a-thon. Therefore, I’ll likely just be picking the top choice. But since these are all the first books of a series I’ve yet to start, if I enjoy them I may end up binging the corresponding series!

In case you’re not familiar with any of these titles, they are all YA fiction. Heist Society is contemporary, Falling Kingdoms is fantasy, and The Diabolic is science fiction. They all sound fascinating! Personally, I’ve been most excited to start Heist Society, but after skimming the summary I’d also pretty stoked if The Diabolic wins. But it’s not my choice which I read for this read-a-thon; it’s yours! Vote in the poll down below. ☟

❧ ☙ End Note ☙ ❧

Let me know in the comments if you’ve read any of these books and what you thought! I don’t feel like these books are from very popular series, but I’m excited to finally be given a reason to reach for them now. I discovered the Throne of Glass series and the Lunar Chronicles series in past years of #MakeMeRead, so I’m excited to see what series will next join these iconic series in my history with this read-a-thon.

Also, let me know if you’ll be participating in this read-a-thon, along with links to your posts and polls! I’ll be happy to chime in ^_^

Thank you for reading!
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  1. Featured Image, base image: “Like a bright airship the New Moon sails by” by Shirley Kite
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The Unique Blogger Award | Blog Tag

Last week I was nominated for the The Unique Blogger Award by Sara @ The Bibliophagist. This is such a short and sweet little tag, I was happy to accept it and schedule it for this weekend. Especially once the week had passed and I realized I wouldn’t have a book review ready this week! I’m still reading Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko, and I’m not sure how I’m going to review it yet.

It’s a bit deep but I don’t know how many people are interested in Native American literature, so I may save it for a mini-review post once I’ve read a few more books from my I-should-have-read these-for-class-but-did-not TBR shelf.

The Rules

  1. Share the link of the blogger who nominated you
  2. Answer their questions
  3. Share some love with the blogging community by nominating 8-12 people
  4. Ask three questions for your nominees

Three Questions from Sara

1. What’s your favorite quote from a book you’ve read this year?

Oh, there are so many in A Ring of Endless Light by Madeleine L’Engle, which I reviewed last month. It’s been years since I gave this book a reread and it was just as amazing as I remembered.

 It’s hard to let go anything we love. We live in a world which teaches us to clutch. But when we clutch we’re left with a fistful of ashes.

I find this quote so moving because it kind of explains the type of grief I feel most of us can relate to feeling at some point in our lives, whether we’ve lost someone we love or are forced to part with something that brought us happiness. Change is hard, but inevitable and often necessary.

I find many of the ideas presented in A Ring of Endless Light in coincidental conversation with the other things I’ve read this year, including my current read, Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko. A quote I find my mind going back to as I read it is:

 …things which don’t shift and grow are dead things. They are things the witchery people want. Witchery works to scare people, to make them fear growth.

This passage from Ceremony is about how the Indians fear changes in their culture. The protagonist Tayo is half-Indian, half-white and finds help post-WWII in a medicine man who, like him, is the child of mixed heritage who understands the world differently from Tayo’s fellow Laguna Indians.

2. What book would you love to see made into a movie or TV series?

I would’ve loved for Ready Player One by Ernest Cline to be made into a T.V. series. The first time I read that book, I stayed up all night reading it. I couldn’t put it down. And for weeks after, I was plotting the episodes-that-could-be in my head. I never really do that for books! The characters and storylines in the book could be so wonderfully portrayed in a binge-worthy T.V. series. The movie Spielberg made, while fun, was so different from the book, almost a completely different plot (necessary because of the time constraints).

3. If you could frame one book cover and hang it up in your house, which cover would it be?

Yes, Please by Amy Poehler. It’s been forever since I read this book, but I’ve since fallen in love with Parks & Rec and admire Amy Poehler and her work to inspire women/girls so much. I also love the cover because of the hot-neon-pink words that I think sum up a beautiful motto for life that I could do better to remember.

Three Questions from Me

  1. What books have been your favorite and your least favorite this year so far?
  2. What is the strangest book you’ve ever read?
  3. If you could resurrect any dead book character, who would it be?

I Nominate:

E, My Narrative | Rose Petal Pages | Misty Book Space

End Note

I’m a bit behind on my blog plans for the month! I’ve enjoyed spending time with my mom these last couple of weeks before my Dad returns home from Israel. We’ve been Shopkicking a lot, because I have my eye on some new books that can’t justify buying right now while I’m looking for a job. I’m about a day or two away from a $25 gift card for Amazon so I may have a book haul to share at the end of the month. Fingers crossed!

Thank you for reading!
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Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter | ★★★★½

I first read Vassa in the Night in August of 2017. It was recommended by Leigh Bardugo, one of my favorite authors, in library interview I watched on YouTube. I find it really fascinating to see what works inspire my favorite authors. It causes me to look into books that I otherwise might never give a chance. In investigating Bardugo’s recommendations, I was enchanted by the summary for Vassa in the Night.

I already knew I loved fairytale retellings set in the modern world. I was unfamiliar with Vasilisa the Beautiful, but eager to check out this book that sounded so different from anything I’ve read. From skimming the top reviews on Goodreads, I can tell this book is a little polarizing. After having read it a second time, I’ve compiled a list of notes you might like to know ahead of time if you want to enjoy it.

  1. You need to suspend your disbelief and not expect there to be explanations behind the magical stuff that happens. Rules and reasons for ambiguity will emerge gradually and you just have to take them as they are, as Vassa is forced to.
  2. Two, you need to know this book is really weird. So fantastically weird. I saw one review that compared it negatively to Alice in Wonderland, however, I do not agree that it matches that level of inexplicable absurdity. The absurdities in this book have interpretable meaning.
  3. Oh! and three, this book is not for the faint of heart. It’s downright terrifying at times. Sometimes I could visualize what I was reading as if I was actually watching a horror movie. Other parts were funny in that dead-pan kind of way. It’s a bit odd, which I think makes it more scary at times.

• • • Vassa in the Night • • •

Screen Shot 2018-07-02 at 9.42.27 AMReleased: September 20, 2016
Pages: 296 pages (hardcover)
Theme(s): Self-discovery, honoring obligations, the strength of kindness, what makes someone somebody, compartmentalizing, dealing with grief
Genre(s): Young Adult / Urban Folklore / Fiction
Age Group: 12+

★★★★½

In the enchanted kingdom of Brooklyn, the fashionable people put on cute shoes, go to parties in warehouses, drink on rooftops at sunset, and tell themselves they’ve arrived. A whole lot of Brooklyn is like that now—but not Vassa’s working-class neighborhood.

In Vassa’s neighborhood, where she lives with her stepmother and bickering stepsisters, one might stumble onto magic, but stumbling away again could become an issue. Babs Yagg, the owner of the local convenience store, has a policy of beheading shoplifters—and sometimes innocent shoppers as well. So when Vassa’s stepsister sends her out for light bulbs in the middle of night, she knows it could easily become a suicide mission.

But Vassa has a bit of luck hidden in her pocket, a gift from her dead mother. Erg is a tough-talking wooden doll with sticky fingers, a bottomless stomach, and a ferocious cunning. With Erg’s help, Vassa just might be able to break the witch’s curse and free her Brooklyn neighborhood. But Babs won’t be playing fair…

*  ⁎   My Thoughts   ⁎ * 

I really love this book. It’s a lot of fun, very inventive in its world and plot, and provides a surprising lot to think about. Vassa in the Night is a journey of self-discovery masked as a survival story. I really like stories where characters learn more about themselves and where the magic fits neatly into the modern world.

While Vassa’s story seems to be incited by a random series of events that leads to her decision to go buy lightbulbs in the infamously dangerous convenience store, she (and readers tagging along for the ride) discover that her encounter with Babs was set in motion long before she ever needed lightbulbs. We all learn that about the people and actions that molded Vassa into the the person that she is and that she also needed help long before her life was in jeopardy.

At the beginning of the book, Babs tells Vassa that she owes her a debt that is “more than [she] owe[s] [her]self” (54). It comes off oddly at this point in the book, for it is a hint that Babs has some inexplicable knowledge about Vassa, despite that night being their first meeting. It also sticks out because it perplexes Vassa.

What did I borrow from myself and how on earth will I ever give it back?

At first, I thought that this moment was a hint at some larger universal lesson that may speak to readers. I was surprised to find it actually spoke more directly to an issue that Vassa has been avoiding and, in effect, has hides from us until the end of the novel. While Babs is the villain of this novel, but she’s also just a catalyst for a journey of self-discovery that Vassa doesn’t know she needs until she’s forced to face it.

There’s so much more I’d love to talk about in greater depth, but I don’t want to write a full-blown dissertation on this book! I will just say that there are so many more layers to this book that speak to what substance makes someone somebody, how satisfying dreams can be compared to reality, and the long-lasting effects of grief. And it’s beautifully written without trying too hard, ya know what I mean?

If this is really my last night and my last moments are jangling like coins in my pocket, then I might as well spend them on wishes.

 —✃ Craft  ✃—

Point of View • Vassa is the first-person narrator of the book, written primarily in present-tense. There are also short chapters interspersed throughout the book for the reader’s sake called interludes. They give some background information that Vassa wouldn’t have access to.

Setting The book almost entirely takes place in the dancing BY’s convenience store of Brooklyn in New York run by the witch Babs Yagg. While Vassa is trapped on the premises, she is able to escape only in her sleep on occasion shared with the motorcyclist who is also trapped and stuck circling the store perimeter during the long city nights. The store is held together with magic that makes it rotate in the sky and have a seemingly endless amount of space inside Bab’s private office, as Vassa discovers on a day-time quest to rescue her the motorcyclist and the two lawyers she sends in to surprise Babs.

Plot   After Vassa agrees to pay her “debt” to Babs with three nights of work in the store and demonstrate her character, she is given trials and tasks meant to spell her doom but which through seemingly complete chance end in her favor. But during these nights, she is also learning about the others who are drawn into BY’s orbit, including the henchmen, the unwilling “night guard”, and the bold, trouble-making teenagers.

Characterization  All the characters are written with clear and distinct voices that make them seem so real. Vassa who narrates the book has an easy-going sense of humor but also a detachment that makes her an interesting protagonist to follow. Erg, her doll, is wicked fun and very dramatic. In my head she had Kimmy Schmidt’s highly excited puppet voice. The lawyers (“attorneys at large”) were absurd and hilarious with their overly formal, professional speak.

Problems  Usually I find short chapters help to keep me turning the pages as I read, but for some reason after each one I felt like I should put the book down. That’s why it took me a little longer to finish this book than I thought I would. I also feel like the book suffers from not introducing Vassa’s mother issues earlier on. I think Vassa’s character development could have been more clearly delineated, but it got buried with the focus on the plights of other characters.

Similar Books 

Mr. Fox Shadow and Bone The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender
If you like beautiful, perplexing adult fiction tinged with horror and diversity… If you want to start a YA fantasy series inspired by Russian folklore… If you want to read a beautiful YA novel that follows a matriarchal family history…

 ❧ ☙ END NOTE ☙ ❧

I’m sorry this review is coming late this week, but I hope it was worth it. I also hope you liked the changes to the format. I think it’s more fun, useful, and readable. One of the problems that I always grapple with is writing too much, which I knooowwww is for my own benefit more than others’. I think I was able I capture most of what I wanted to say about Vassa in the Night.

Tomorrow I am aiming to release two blog posts (one in the a.m. and the other in the p.m.) following up on my blog hopping journey last month! The first will likely be some lessons I hope to remember and the second my long-awaited list of favorite blogs I discovered.

Have you read Vassa in the Night? If so, what’d you think?!

Thank you for reading!
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Tower of Dawn | Spoiler Talk

[WARNING: Do not read if you haven’t read Queen of Shadows (QoS)Empire of Storms (EoS) or are planning to read Tower of Dawn (ToD).]

After I finished reading ToD last month, I realized that I personally would have been fine having skipped that book and just spoiling myself in preparation for the final installment of the Throne of Glass series. Although, I think it is skippable, I do not know how important Chaol, Nesryn, or any of the new characters will be in the final book, which is why I attempted to pull out the most important tidbits from ToD and share them in this post.

There a few reasons why I don’t think ToD was worth the time or money that I will detail below before I jump into the spoilers.

  1. Before jumping into this book, I already despised Chaol and was indifferent to Nesryn, and nothing about this book changed my opinions on them. If you like these characters, you might find this book a worth while read and in which case I recommend not continuing to read this post!
  2. This book was just too damned long. It took forever for me to read because there was just so little happening in the first part especially. Most of the time with SJM books, I have found the pay off in the end worth continuing on. But in this book, I’m not sure any of the revelations justify the time wasted trying to finish the book, unless you’re a die-hard Chaol fan.
  3. Finally, I don’t think that this book illustrates how far SJM has come as a author. I’ve read almost every book she’s written at this point (I still see no reason to pick up The Assassin’s Blade). I know this is an unpopular opinion but Throne of Glass was horrible. It was so derivative of other popular YA novels and Celaena was one of the worst Mary Sue’s I’ve ever seen disguised as an assassin. But I’ve kept reading. And since Heir of Fire and A Court of Mist and Fury, I’ve had complete faith in her ability to churn out great rollercoaster books.

That being said, I have no doubt that ToD was just filler book. She’s been publishing two books per year and this year it caught up with her and she had to publish something this fall. I don’t fault her for it and I don’t fully regret reading this book. I just feel like writing this post will make have made the experience worth it.

Quick Recap

I’m not going to summarize the entire book; that would take forever. I just want to set up the novel before I jump into the spoilers I think will be important to know/remember to ready for the final book.

towerofdawn

Set during the events of EoS, ToD opens with Chaol & Nesryn having reached the Southern Continent at Antica where they travelled to in order to find someone who could heal Chaol after his accident at the end of QoS which left him paralyzed from the waist down. Antica is known the world around for their healers, second only, perhaps, to the Fae healers of Wendlyn.

They were also charged to act as diplomats and convince the khagan to join Adarlan and Terrasen in their war against Duke Perrington (aka Erawan)’s forces in Morath. Unfortunately for them, the khagan recently suffered the death of one of his children and the family is in mourning that renders any war negotiation inappropriate. Therefore, Chaol & Nesryn must cosy up to his remaining children who are nearly all vying to become the heir to the khaganate.

Now that we’re all caught up, I’ll proceed with all the spoilers you’ll find necessary if you plan to read the seventh and final book in the Throne of Glass series, which still does currently not have a title and is tentatively slated for a Fall 2018 release.

Spoilers

#1 Chaol and Nesryn, who are friends with benefits at the beginning of the novel, find new lovers.

Chaol falls in love with his healer, Yrene, who is the unofficial heir to the position of Healer on High. She is eager to leave Antica in order to help her homeland of Fenharrow in the war. She also hates Chaol as the former Captain of the Guard to the Adarlan king who slaughtered and enslaved her people. So naturally she falls in love with him while he’s all broody about his disability and his wavering loyalty to Nesryn.

Nesryn, meanwhile, grows close to Prince Sartaq who commands their country’s army of ruk riders. The ruk is an enormous eagle-like bird that just might stand a chance against the witch’s wyverns. In ToD Nesryn joins Sartaq as he investigates who is abducting ruk eggs. In a moment of fear that he might die, he reveals he loves her and the book ends with Sartaq as the presumed heir to the khaganate, even after he’s revealed his feelings for Nesryn.

#2 Magical healers may hold the key to saving people whose bodies have been invested by the Valg.

Yrene discovers by healing the dark magic that lingered in Chaol’s back preventing him from being able to walk how her own healing power may be used to combat people who have been completely taken over. Her suspicion is tested and proven at the climax ToD when they discover a Valg has been impersonating khagan’s pregnant daughter Duva.

Yrene and Chaol also suspect that Maeve and Valg are aware of the strength of this power, which explains why the Valg hunt Yrene throughout the novel as she tries to learn the root of the dark magic lingering in Chaol and why Maeve has kept the Fae healers (and secret source of the healing power in the Southern Continent) so close to her.

#3 Aelin’s evil Fae aunt Maeve is not really her aunt but a freakin’ Valg princess.

That’s right. Maeve is a Valg princess who is the reason the Valg princes turned their sights on this world. She ran away from them and they came looking for her, which is the cause of the first great war. And because of her powers, she was able to trick the most powerful Fae in this world Mab & Mora that she was their sister.

This all is revealed by a chatty stygian spider while she holds Nesryn and Sartaq prisoner. These spiders, which (according to the Throne of Glass wikia) were introduced in Heir of Fire, are revealed to be Valg handmaidens to Maeve, guarding the portal to the other world from which they came. (If you remembered these spider things, props to you! I certainly did not. I laughed out loud when they were introduced at a pretty serious moment.)

End Note

If you’ve read this book yourself and think I have neglected to note any important spoilers feel free to let me know & I might add them to my list along with a link to your blog in thanks! Also feel free to let me know if I got anything wrong or if  you think that ToD was worth reading. Although I wouldn’t have minded skipping this one, I still rated it three stars on Goodreads because it was enjoyable at times. But I do also wish I had used my time to read books I know will be so much better.

Thank you for reading!
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October ’17 TBR + Goals

I was hesitant to make this post, especially considering how busy I’ve been and how I’d like to use as much as possible of my time working on writing this month. Nevertheless, October is my favorite month, and there are a bunch of books that I think would be perfect reads for this time of year!

For this month’s TBR I have a list of books from which I will most likely pull my reads, but I by no means hope to attempt to read all of them! That would be madness, and highly unadvisable if I want to get anything else done this month. I’m hoping to read at least three

 

[In no particular order]

  1. It by Stephen King
  2. The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales & Dangerous Magic by Leigh Bardugo
  3. White Cat by Holly Black
  4. Uprooted by Naomi Novik
  5. The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro
  6. Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

Goals

#1 Prioritize the blog each week. Last month I let the blog slide as I got busier with work and wanted to spend more time reading to finally catch up on my Goodreads Reading Challenge, which I did manage to finally do after months of being behind!

#2 Get my grad school application materials organized. Last month I decided I definitely still wanted to return to grad school for my doctorate. I want to be prepared well in advance of my deadlines so that I’m not in a panic when everything’s due (likely around December). This will entail asking for my letters of recommendation, tidying up writing samples, and likely writing some personal statements.

#3 Be ready to kick NaNoWriMo 2017’s butt. It’s been three years since I won, and I want this year to end my losing streak!

End Note

I’m hoping to have a writing-related post up this week on Wednesday. I Skyped with my writing buddy last night and her excitement for her story revived my own so I’d like to start dedicated more time to it after work. Fortunately my next full day off work is Wednesday so I’m hoping to get a lot done then, including some blog posts. So hopefully I will see you then with my next post!

Thank you for reading!
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A Book Haul of eBooks and Fairytales

A few weeks ago after I learned my free time would be severely limited as result of my new job, I decided to treat myself to some new books. As I was browsing for the books I would purchase, I realized one of the books of an author I was looking into was free in its Kindle edition for Amazon Prime members, so I downloaded some others I found that interested me as well.

In general, I’m fairly restrained when it comes to buying books, so I rarely get the chance to do a haul. Therefore, I decided to seize the day do one today (at long last)!

This book haul comes at a time when I’m kicking my writing into full gear, which is why I want to get my hands on everything that looks like it might inspire my own novel. Therefore, you’ll find that many of these books are in the genre(s) in which I want to write: fantasy.

Amazon Prime Free eBooks

 

Heist Society by Ally Carter. This book is the reason I began searching for what other eBooks were conveniently available for free download on Amazon Prime. I saw an interview where Leigh Bardugo recommended Carter’s work for anyone interested in heist books like Six of Crows. I’m skeptical (based on its cringe-y cover), but I’m hoping to be pleasantly surprised!

The Spy with No Name by Jeff Maysh. This book and author I’ve never heard of, but I like a good mystery and the intrigue of spies. Not sure when I’ll read this book, though, as there are so many amazing books I want to read right now. This one smells to me like one buffer book when I need something random to fill my time when I don’t feel like jumping into something super thought provoking.

Air Awakens by Elise Kova. The is the first book in a series I’ve seen talked about a lot in the book blogging community! I’ve intentionally kept myself in the dark as to what this book is about, but I’m happy to have the opportunity to finally see if this book, and series, is for me.

Fallout (Lois Lane) by Gwenda Bond. This book I’ve already DNF-ed. I didn’t have the highest of expectations for this book, but I did have an open mind as I’ve been eagerly anticipating Leigh Bardugo’s Wonder Woman. This book very quickly lost me. I compared it to fan fiction on Goodreads, but honestly that’s unfair to fan fiction as I’ve read far better written fan-written stories with realistic, nuanced characters.

Thieving Forest by Martha Conway. This book, like most of the others on this list, is one that I know next to nothing about. I haven’t even reread the summary to remind myself why I decided to download it. I just saw the medal on it and decided to trust that distinction. Like The Spy with No Name, this is one I’ll probably save for when I’m between books and don’t know quite what I’m in the mood for.

Fairytale-Inspired Books

 

Uprooted by Naomi Novik. This is a book that has been on my radar for a long-time and the main reason I’ve put it off is I’m not a fan of the U.S. edition cover and the price of the hardback was too high for me. I was able to order it at a reasonable price in paperback and I feel like this book is coming to me at the perfect time as I just feel like this book will inspire my own writing.

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter. This book was recommended by Leigh Bardugo in an interview I watched on YouTube in which she was asked what she recommended (redundant…leaving it anyway). I loved the summary so I decided to put it on my wishlist for a time like this when I wanted to treat myself.

What’s Not Yours Is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi. Because I’ve just been reading Mr. Fox, I’ve been reminded what a beautiful writer Oyeyemi is and I decided to finally spring for this anthology. I had put it off for the same reasons that I put off Uprooted for so long, but I’m excited to finally be able to read these short stories and, hopefully, have her magic rub off on me!

The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo. This book is not technically out yet, but it is a vanity purchase I made earlier this month. Many of the stories in this anthology are already available for free online, but I wanted to be able to put the pretty book to put on my shelves. I love Leigh Bardugo’s books and she is on my short list of authors whose books I will instantly purchase, which brings me to the final book in my haul…

&

Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo! Ok, so this is not technically a fairytale, but the argument could be made that it is a similar kind of genre! Not that I’m a genre expert… I am not a big fan of Wonder Woman, as I did not grow up with any of her shows and have never been too impressed by “strong women” dressed in leotards. I’m not really a DC Comics fan either (based on my experience with their lame movies), but a lot of feminists I respect LOVE the character of Wonder Woman and I’m hoping this book will make me love her too! ^_^

End Note

I hope you enjoyed this post! I am not in the habit of doing a lot of book hauls, as I rarely buy/acquire enough books to warrant one. Another book that didn’t make this list because I won’t have it for a few more days is Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas, her latest Throne of Glass installment. It comes out early next month, so I’m excited even though it’s centered on Chaol, a character I’ve never really liked.

Today I’ve been working on my blog in between chores. You can expect to see a few more posts later this week as we head into September. Until then, let me know if you’ve read any of these books in the comments down below.

Thank you for reading!
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Writing Again // Introducing “The Log”

Sorry it has been a little while. Shortly after the excitement of the last post I had a crisis of self. Faced with so many things I wanted to do and needed to do, I wasn’t sure what to do and it was so easy to just do nothing. Does this happen to any of you?

Fortunately I’ve been taking care of myself and feel a bit more happy. I’ve been eating a plant-based diet and enjoying experimenting with new whole plant foods I can integrate into my daily diet. I’ve also made exercise a part of my daily routine that I enjoy and look forward to. These two lifestyle changes I credit for helping me feel more ambitious and motivated again to do even more with my day, including things that have always made me happy: reading and writing.

I decided to start this post because I wanted to announce my new writing project, but I figure I’ll also talk a bit about what I’ve read recently first.

Recently Read

So far this summer I’ve read four books. I reread A Court of Mist and Fury (★★★★★) and finally read A Court of Wings and Ruin (★★★★½), both by Sarah J. Maas. Love the final installment, although I can’t help but feel the ending was a bit rushed and too convenient. Then I decided to read something that was not fantasy, so I picked up The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry (★★★★½) by Gabrielle Zevin, which was whimsical and easy to read. Then I decided to finally read Passenger (★★), which sounded really good. Unfortunately that book didn’t really click with me.

Currently Reading

I’m currently rereading The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. I’ve owned thisbook since middle school and one I had begun to think about since reading Sarah J. Maas’ work because it also includes fairies, although a very different kind. It’s a nice reminder that you can be inspired by the old and make it into something new that is your own.

Screen Shot 2017-07-13 at 9.20.00 PM

I may talk about this book in more depth in the future as I think it may be lesser known YA classic and something that young readers today might truly enjoy. If you’ve read it before, please let me know in the comments!

I’m planning on participating in the BookTube-A-Thon next week in order to jump start some more reading so I’ll likely share my TBR for that soon.

What I’m Writing 

I’m writing a fantasy novel set in world kind of like ours in 1930s, but with magic and magical creatures. I think it could be considered somewhat steampunk as I want there to be a lot of alternative forms of technology. My protagonist is a young girl and…I don’t know how much more I want to say!

I’m in the beginning stages here and still need to do some major plotting before I properly get writing, but I have a beginning and end fairly well set in stone so I’m excited to see where this may go. If you’ve been following me for a while, you may know I have trouble finishing novel drafts. I’ve realized in addition to low confidence in my writing capabilities my biggest problem is probably getting lost by following plot bunnies.

I may soon try to set up a Pinterest mood board for the story and share if I do. From this point forward on my blog if I mention it, I’ll call this novel The Log.

End Note

That’s all I got for today. I don’t want to make any promises about what I’ll post next, but I’m feeling pretty confident right now that I’ll be doing more and thus have more to share that is hopefully of interest to you! Hope you’re doing well and see you soon!

Thank you for reading!
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